our gotplates car dealer licensing preparation tutorial is unique in the industry

We provide the best dealer education in all of California.
Our in-person classes are now offered in 39 cities.
+++
We conduct more classes than any other dealer education provider.
TriStar Motors LLC has been a provider of dealer education since 1998.
+++
Our extensive law enforcement training background
has given us a foundation to build
comprehensive car dealer training.
+++
We offer our New Car Dealer Class for as low
as $100 and we will teach you the steps toward
getting DMV Certification.
+++
Our teaching addresses the frustration some
experience trying to find simple, concise
answers to dealership and car dealer
related questions.
+++

DMV requires repossessions to be done by licensed agencies

Frequently Asked Questions – Repossession Agency (RA)

  1. How long after the application is submitted will it take to process?The complete processing of the application may take approximately three to six months.
  2. What forms must be included in the application package?
    • Application for License (Form 31A-4)
    • Personal Identification (Form 31A-9)
    • The second copy of the Live Scan form (BCII 8016) signed by the Live Scan Operator.
    • Two recent passport quality photographs
    • Request for Authorization of Business name [(Form 31A-12 (if applicable)]
    • Corporate applicants only: endorsed Articles of Incorporation or the Statement by a Foreign Corporation (if filed with the Secretary of State)

    Corporate applicants only: endorsed Articles of Incorporation or the Statement by a Foreign Corporation (if filed with the Secretary of State)

  3. How long is a Repossession Agency license valid?The Repossession Agency license is valid for two years.
  4. How does a Repossession Agency renew its license?Prior to the expiration of the license, the applicant may receive a renewal application mailed to the last address of record. If you do not receive a renewal application, you should submit a copy of your license/certificate with a written request for renewal, including the fees for renewal (see fee schedule) and mail to:

    Bureau of Security and Investigative Services
    P.O. Box 989002
    West Sacramento CA 95798-9002

    (This must be submitted before the expiration date.)

  5. When does a Repossession Agency’s license become delinquent?The Repossession Agency’s license is delinquent one day after it expires. If you fail to submit renewal fees by the expiration date, you must pay the renewal fee and the delinquent fee.
  6. How long after the expiration of my license am I able to renew my license?If after three years you fail to renew a delinquent license you must submit a new application and begin the application process again.
  7. How do I verify receipt of my Repossession Agency application?Contact the Bureau at (916) 322-4000 for a status on a pending application or any additional information.
  8. How do I notify the Bureau of my change of address?You must notify the Bureau in writing within 30 days of such a change. Be sure that you include your license number, name, previous address, new address, date of birth and Social Security number. Please print information.
  9. How do I change my business name?In order for you to change your business name, you must submit a written request to the Bureau. Submit at least six names for consideration. The first name requested will be approved unless the name could be confused with or is similar to any federal, state, county, or municipal government function or agency or to any law enforcement agency, or in any name which may tend to describe any business function or enterprise not actually engaged in by the applicant/licensee under that name.

    *Until an approval is received, you may not operate under your requested new name.

  10. If I lost, destroyed or damaged my Repossession Agency license, how do I obtain a duplicate?You may request a duplicate license by submitting a written request, explaining the circumstances, with a $10 fee to the Bureau. Please allow four to six weeks for replacement.
  11. The name/address was misspelled on my license. Is there a fee for a new one?No. An error on a license should be returned for correction to the Bureau without charge. A correction will take approximately three to four weeks. Please clarify the error in writing and return the license.(This is not for address changes when submitted after a renewal was paid and already mailed)
  12. Can a Repossession Agency use a post office box for an address?Yes. The Repossession Agency must state the location of the business office by street name, number and city. The Repossessor Agency may list a post office box only if mail delivery to the physical location is not possible or if the place of business is located at the licensee’s residential address. In addition, no licensee shall conduct business from any location other than the location for which a license or branch office registration was issued.
  13. How long does it take to process the new license after a request for name change and/or address change or change of branch office has been made?The processing time will vary, typically a name change and/or address change or branch change will take approximately four to six weeks.
  14. There has been a change in the type of ownership/entity after receiving the repossession agency license. What do I have to do?Licenses are not transferable or assigned to new entities. A change of ownership constitutes a new entity. You must submit a new application with appropriate fees. For example: if you apply and become licensed as a sole owner and later decide to form a partnership or corporation, you must apply for a new license.
  15. Who can repossess my car, truck, motorcycle, or other vehicle?The legal owner, and the repossessor agency employee of a repossession agency.
  16. Does the legal owner have to notify me before taking my vehicle?No. The legal owner is not required to notify you before your vehicle is repossessed. However, the legal owner must notify you in writing within 60 days that you have 15 days to arrange to get your car back before it is sold. If the vehicle was repossessed by a licensed repossession agency, the agency must notify you within 48 hours that they have repossessed your vehicle and must furnish you with a list of the personal items in the vehicle at the time it was repossessed.
  17. Can they repossess my vehicle if I have only missed one payment?Yes. The conditions under which the vehicle may be repossessed are subject to the terms of the sales contract signed by you at the time you bought your vehicle. However, some legal owners will work with you to bring your payments up to date, even though they are not required by law to do so. If you expect a problem in making payment, you should contact the legal owner to make other arrangements for payment.
  18. Can they take my car at 4 a.m., or while I am in the grocery store?As long as the repossessor agency employee does not enter any private building or any secured area he or she may take your vehicle at any time from any location. This does not mean that the repossessor agency employee can do anything that is illegal. The repossessor agency employee must obey the same laws that pertain to everyone.
  19. Can a repossessor agency employee agent break my gate, unlock my garage, move other vehicles, or trample my landscape while trying to take my car?No. repossessor agency employees are prohibited from entering any private building or secured area without the consent of the owner or the person in legal possession of the property. This includes any locked and fenced area. Any damage to buildings, fences, landscaping, or other vehicles should be reported to the police. In addition, a complaint should be filed with the Bureau. To get your money back for damaged personal property or real property, you will probably have to go to small claims court or hire an attorney. The Bureau has no jurisdiction to get your money back for damaged personal property.
  20. Should I hide my vehicle or physically protect it from the repossessor agency employee?No. A repossession agency with authorization from the legal owner will attempt to take your vehicle for the legal owner. If you hide the vehicle to avoid repossession, you may give up your right to continue with the same contract with the legal owner.
  21. Can a repossessor agency employee threaten my family or me?No. A repossessor agency employee may not use violence or force in attempting to repossess a vehicle. If violence or force occurs, contact the police immediately. A repossessor agency employee may not use false or misleading statements or make threats in order to take your vehicle.
  22. What happens to my personal belongings in the car after my car has been repossessed?Licensed repossession agencies are required to make a list of all personal belongings found in a vehicle at the time of repossession. They are required to send you at your last known address of record, within 48 hours, a notice containing this list and informing you how to recover your personal belongings and the amount of storage fees owed, if any.
  23. Are my spare tire, tape deck, and mag wheels considered part of my personal belongings?Items such as tape deck or mag wheels, which are installed as a permanent part of the vehicle generally, remain with the vehicle. So do items such as a spare tire or tire iron, which are normal equipment for a vehicle to carry. However, any item such as a removable camper shell, which was not included in the original contract for your vehicle, should be returned to you, although you may be asked to prove that you bought the camper shell separately.
  24. Should I be notified about who took my vehicle and why?A repossession agency is required to provide you with a Notice of Seizure within 48 hours after taking possession of your vehicle. This notice must include the name, address, and telephone number of the legal owner and the name, address, and telephone number of the repossession agency. They should tell you that this Bureau regulates repossessor employees and that the repossession agency is required to give you a personal property inventory within 48 hours of the repossession, and that any damage to a vehicle during repossession is the responsibility of the repossession agency. To find out why your vehicle was repossessed you should contact the legal owner of your vehicle.
  25. What if my car is damaged during or after repossession?The Notice of Seizure, which the repossession agency is required to send you lists that damage to a vehicle during or after repossession, is the responsibility of the repossession agency. Unfortunately, the Bureau cannot actually enforce this responsibility by making the repossession agency pay you for any damage to your car. In case of damage, you should take the repossession agency to small claims or civil court, depending on the estimated cost of repair. You should also file a written complaint with the Bureau, as several complaints of damage against the same repossession agency could result in disciplinary action against that agency.
  26. Can repossession agency employees drive my vehicle or use my personal effects after they have repossessed my car?No. A repossession agency employee may not use any vehicle or personal effects recovered from a consumer for personal benefit. If you believe your vehicle was used during the time the agency had it, you should file a complaint with the Bureau explaining the circumstances which lead you to believe it was used.
  27. What should I do if something is missing from my personal effects when I pick them up?Mention it to the repossession company while you are there and ask them to check their storage area again. Note it on the release form if the items are not located. Follow up with a registered letter to the repossession agency (with a copy to the lien-holder) describing the missing items and ask them to locate them or reimburse you for them. If they don’t comply with your request, send a written complaint to the Bureau of Security and Investigative Services. If some of your belongings are missing you should contact your local police department and begin a small claims court or civil court action to have the repossession agency repay you for your lost possessions.
  28. What about my personalized license plates?Department of Motor Vehicles (DMV) has advised us that personalized plates should be removed and stored with other personal effects. If you do not claim them within the 60 days, the repossession company should return them to the DMV.
  29. How do I get my vehicle back?The legal owner must give you 15 days written notice before they can sell or otherwise dispose of your vehicle. This notice must be provided within 60 days after repossession. This notice should tell you how to redeem your vehicle and should give you the name and address of the person to contact about payment. Usually, you will be able to reinstate your loan contract by paying your back payments and the repossession fee, unless the legal owner can prove that you did one of the following: A. gave false information on your loan application B. hid the vehicle to keep it from being repossessed C. kept the vehicle in bad repair or damaged it on purpose If the vehicle loan is with your credit union or a finance company, the above information may not apply to you.
  30. What charges, if any, might I have to pay?In addition to paying all or part of the contract balance, you may have to pay a repossession charge. Most vehicle installment loan contracts state that you may be charged for the costs of recovering the vehicle if you default on the loan payments. Therefore, the legal owners may charge you for the amount which they have been billed by the repossession agency. Also, most repossession agencies charge a fee for storage of personal items that were in the vehicle at the time it was repossessed. The amount of the storage fees must be given on the personal property notice prepared by the repossession agency and will be collected at the time you pick up your personal items. Many repossession agencies require that these charges be paid in CASH. If you choose not to make the payments within the 15 days allowed, the legal owner will arrange for your car to be sold. If the buyer does not pay the full contract balance, you may be required to pay the difference, which is referred to as a deficiency.
  31. How are the police involved in repossessions?Immediately after the repossession, the repossessor must notify the local police or sheriff’s department that he has taken your vehicle. As long as the repossessor has the proper identification and can show that the legal owner hired him to repossess your vehicle, the police will probably not interfere with the repossession, even if you call them. However, if you feel that the repossessor has threatened or harmed you or damaged your property, or entered your car or property illegally, you should call the police and file a police report.
  32. How do I file a complaint with the Bureau?A consumer may contact the Department of Consumer Affairs’, Consumer Information Center at 1-(800) 952-5210 and request a complaint form. Please provide copies of all documents relating to your complaint with your completed complaint form.

need vehicle history ??? get VIN audit the carfax alternative for car dealers

+++++

http://vinaudit.com/gotplates
for 5 free vehicle history reports
$ 20. per month subscription
$ 1.00 per vehicle history report

AND TO ORDER STICKERS :

http://www.gotplates.com/books.php

CA DMV Red Salvage Stickers ( set of 50 ) by TriStar Motors
$45.00

CA DMV Red Verified Clean Title Stickers ( set of 50 ) by TriStar Motors
$45.00

thx
Joseph
gotplates.com
800-901-5950

the best car dealer license classes in california

PRE-LICENSING CLASS LOCATIONS


Click on an city for class locations, times and information:


Private Classes for Renewal and Pre-License Students
We provide you the ability to operate your dealership within current DMV guidelines. You get to sit back and relax for 4 to 6 hours of dealer education (renewals 4 hr/ pre-licensing 6 hr). We will have you review your dealership with a series of questions and at the end of the course we will provide the course completion form.We teach private classes in all locations listed above as well as:

· Aptos
· Clovis
· Fresno
· Novato
· Ukiah


Prices for these classes:
1) $200 private renewal
2) $300 private pre-licensing

Additionally, we offer a “travel out” to your location
· the cost is $800 for up to three students, $200 for each additional student
· statewide coverage
· limited by our availability

Contact us for availability


Pre-License Only Class Options and Information:
· You must attend the class in person (6 hrs).
· You will study and take the DMV practice exam similar to the one given by your local inspector.
· A course certificate suitable for framing will be presented upon completion.
· Your certificate is good for one year.
· All materials are included.

Prices for these classes:
1) $100 – take our online tutorial before attending class & get $100.00 off your tuition
2) $200 – saves your seat
3) $300 – private pre-licensing class

central coast dmv certified car dealer license training

dmv requires a training class to take your car dealer license examination

dmv requires you pass a 40 question exam to submit your car dealer license application

we teach the required dmv license certification class in more places than anyone else

find out why our competition struggles to match our offer

could it be better value??

could it be better pricing??

could it be our dedication to customer service??

we like to think it is all three

visit our website to see our entire class schedule

http://gotplates.com/

joseph is our car dealer license instructor on the central coast

415-730-3131

we have a classes in aptos, salinas, san luis obisbo and santa barbara every month

http://gotplates.com/cities.php?city=Aptos

http://gotplates.com/cities.php?city=Salinas

http://gotplates.com/cities.php?city=San%20Luis%20Obisbo

http://gotplates.com/cities.php?city=Santa%20Barbara

good luck with getting your car dealer license

autopia

car dealers must address privacy concerns and government records

Government Records and Your Privacy

1. Introduction

Government records are public in order to enable citizens to monitor their government and to ensure accountability in a democratic society. The challenge to policymakers is to balance the public’s right to information with the individual’s right to privacy.

Virtually every major change in life is recorded somewhere in a government document. Shortly after you are born, a birth certificate is issued.  If you obtain a driver’s license, get married, buy a house, file a lawsuit–all of these events are recorded in public documents easily available to you and to others.

2. Public Records

Note: Most of the information in this section is specific to California.  Other states may vary in how they regulate access to public records.

Public records are just that–public. There are few, if any, restrictions on the release of this information. For example, information from public records is frequently obtained by direct marketers. (See PRC Fact Sheet 4: Junk Mail: How Did They Get My Address?) Public records may also be used by private investigators, attorneys, law enforcement officials and other government agencies. In fact, as more public records are posted online, anyone with a computer and Internet access can easily compile detailed profiles on individuals.

The most common California government records containing personal information are listed below:

Your California Department of Motor Vehicles (DMV) driver’s license file contains:

  • Your name
  • Birth date
  • Home and mailing addresses
  • License number
  • Physical description
  • Social Security number
  • Failures to appear in court
  • Failures to pay traffic fines
  • License status (valid, revoked, suspended, expired)
  • Major traffic convictions for the past seven years
  • Minor traffic convictions for the past three years

The DMV also keeps files of vehicle registrations which include:

  • Name of the person who owns the vehicle
  • Residential and mailing addresses of the registered owner
  • Vehicle year, make and body style
  • Year the vehicle was bought by the current owner and previous owners’ names and addresses going back three years
  • License plate number; vehicle identification number
  • Name of the lien-holder if the loan for the vehicle has not yet been paid in full

DMV files are routinely consulted by employers, insurance companies, attorneys and private investigators. They used to be sold to marketers, but access has been restricted since 1990.

Confidential portions of your file include medical information, home address and Social Security number. Even though it is considered confidential, in some specific instances your home address can be released to insurance companies, banks, attorneys and process servers.

The DMV also releases information to “casual requesters.” However, the requester must apply to the main DMV office in Sacramento and explain the purpose of the request and potential uses of the information. Each request is reviewed by DMV to determine that the purpose of requesting the information is for a legitimate us. http://www.dmv.ca.gov/forms/inf/inf70.htm.

Your Social Security number is required to receive or renew your driver’s license.  This information is considered confidential. The law allows SSNs to be used for tax administration purposes, collecting government fines, and helping track down parents who have not made court-ordered child support payments.

The California driver’s license looks very similar to a plastic credit card with a magnetic “stripe” on the back. The “stripe” holds information which can be read by special scanners. Currently the information on the stripe is the same as the front of the license. It can be used by law enforcement officers to print traffic tickets and by retailers to record information when a customer pays by check. Some privacy advocates are concerned that the magnetic stripe makes it easier for merchants to establish computerized data banks about their customers, and thereby poses a threat to personal privacy.

In California, Civil Code 1798.90.1 prohibits bars, car dealers and others from collecting personal information by swiping the magnetic stripe for purposes other than verifying age or the authenticity of the driver’s license, or preventing fraud.

One court has ruled that the federal Driver’s Privacy Protection Act (18 U.S.C. 2721-2725) allows states to turn over their entire DMV database to certain private entities, including research companies, online database operators, grocery chains, insurance companies, employee screening services, technology businesses and consulting companies. The court held that these entities, which buy DMV records in bulk, are making a permissible use of the information.  Taylor v. Acxiom Corp.(5th Circ., July 14, 2010).

Voting records are kept at the County Clerk’s or Registrar of Voters office and at the California Secretary of State office. California voter records are available to four categories of users: election/political, scholarly, journalistic, or governmental purpose. Requesters must apply to the California Secretary of State or the county elections office for the records and must certify the purpose for their request.

The state offers the Safe at Home program to provide confidential address protection for individuals who must keep their home address private because of personal safety issues. Victims of domestic violence and stalking, employees and volunteers of reproductive health care clinics, and others whose safety is at risk can apply for the California Safe at Home program. For more information, call the California Secretary of State at (877) 322-5227, www.casafeathome.org . At least 28 states offer similar confidentiality programs (See National Network to End Domestic Violence’s list of state confidentiality programs).

Birth certificates are on file in the county in which the birth occurred and at theOffice of Vital Records in Sacramento. Birth records usually contain the name of the child, date and time of birth, the city and the hospital in which the child was born, the parents’ names, the attending physician’s name and various signatures. Birth records housed in the State Vital Records Office are public and can be ordered by anyone with sufficient identifying information (See CA State Vital Record’s explanation of Authorized Copy vs. Informational Copy). County records may be confidential and available only to the subject of the record or by court order. Confidentiality policies differ by county.

Marriage certificates are usually filed in the County Clerk’s office where the marriage application was filed and in the State Vital Records office in Sacramento. An index is available to the public. It contains the bride and groom’s names, the county where the application was filed and the date of the marriage.

In California a couple may file for a confidential marriage certificate which is not placed in the index and is not a public record. A confidential marriage license is open only to the bride and groom or by court order.

Death certificates are also public documents. They are usually kept on file in the county in which the death occurred at the County Clerk’s office. The State Registrar’s office in Sacramento also maintains these files. An index of death certificates is available to the public. It contains the name of the person who died, where the death occurred, the date and the person’s Social Security number.

Property records are open for public inspection. When you purchase a home or other real estate, a record of the transaction is made by the County Assessor’s office and the County Recorder’s office. The files maintained by the Assessor, Tax Collector and/or Recorder contain the location of the property, current owner’s name, address and previous owners’ names, dates of sale, description of the property and the approximate value of the real estate holding. These files are increasingly made available on the Internet by county government agencies and by information brokers.

Court records, unless they involve a juvenile, are usually public. Superior, municipal and small claims court records are kept in the court clerk’s office. The court clerk maintains an index of civil and criminal cases which is filed in alphabetical order by the names of the parties involved. Case files can be retrieved under the name of either the plaintiff or the defendant. They contain the initial complaint, the defendant’s answer and motions filed in the case. Case files may also contain evidence or exhibits that were used in court. Court records are increasingly available on the Internet.

A person involved in a lawsuit can ask the judge to have parts of a case file “sealed.” If the judge consents to seal parts of the record, that portion is no longer open to public viewing. In criminal cases, probation reports, medical information and psychiatric information are removed from the file before it is made available to the public.

The National Center for State Courts has information on state policies for public access to court records on its website at http://www.ncsc.org/topics/access-and-fairness/privacy-public-access-to-court-records/state-links.aspx?cat=Privacy%20Policies%20for%20Court%20Records.

Divorce records are public documents and are usually considered part of court files. They are filed at the Superior Court clerk’s office of the county in which the divorce was granted.

Arrest records are public records. They may include detailed information about the person arrested, the incident leading to the arrest and the victim. These records can be closed if their release would endanger an ongoing investigation or public safety. If the person arrested is found innocent of the charges, he or she may ask to have the record sealed and claim they have never been arrested.

Postal address information is not a matter of public record through the U.S. Postal Service (USPS). However, the information from postal Change of Address forms is available to many people. The Change of Address form carries a notice that the information you provide may be used by others. USPS assumes you have read this warning and consent to the release of your information.

If you move and fill out a Change of Address form (USPS Form 3575), the information is sold by USPS to mailing list, direct mail and credit bureau companies through its National Change of Address (NCOA) system to help mailers update their lists. However, temporary address changes are not included in the NCOA database.

If you file a Change of Address form, USPS will release your new address to those who send you first class mail at the old address for up to 12 months — shorter forwarding limits for magazines and other non-first class mail. Victims of a threatening situation can prevent the release of his or her new address by obtaining a temporary restraining order or court order and presenting it to the Postal Service.

USPS mails a confirmation of the new address to both your new and old addresses. This is a precaution in case an identity thief has fraudulently forwarded your mail to another address. See PRC’s Fact Sheets 17: Copying with Identity Theft: Reducing Your Risk of Fraud and 17a: Identity Theft: What to Do if it Happens to You.

Local post offices will release Change of Address forms to someone presenting a subpoena or court order, to a law enforcement or government official for authorized purposes, or to someone who is certified to serve legal documents.

3. Confidential Records

Some records kept by government agencies are considered confidential. For example, your tax records are private. You may have access to your Internal Revenue Service file but others do not. The following are some common government records which are confidential.

Social welfare information such as Medicare records and Social Securityinformation is generally confidential. However, social service agencies must supply a list of benefit recipients and their Social Security numbers to tax authorities.

In addition, the federal government has a computer matching program which allows agencies to compare computerized records to verify eligibility or compliance with benefit programs. This program is also used to collect debts owed to the government or unpaid child support. If you apply for benefits, you must be told that the matching program is being used. No one can be denied benefits based solely on the results of information obtained through matching.

Tax information, both federal and state, is not a public record. It is not disclosed unless:

  • The taxpayer is part of a court proceeding where tax issues are relevant
  • A government agency is trying to locate a parent who owes child support payments
  • State financial aid programs have been requested
  • It is for statistical use
  • Agencies request tax information for the purpose of tax administration

People who file joint returns have equal access to tax records. Federal law allows the Social Security Administration and the Department of Education access to tax records to withhold tax refunds if money is owed to the government.

School records are usually confidential. (See Fact Sheet 29: Privacy in Education: A Guide for Parents and Adult-Age Students.) Persons over age 18 must authorize the release of their school records before they can be viewed by others (including parents). The records of children under 18 years of age are under the control of their parents and/or guardians. The records can be releasedwithout consent only to:

  • The current school district
  • A school district to which the student is transferring
  • State or federal education authorities
  • State or federal financial aid programs
  • Law enforcement officials for “child welfare” protection
  • Or upon a judge’s order for release

Parents have the right to inspect all records a school has about their child if the child is under 18, and to request that any errors be corrected. In California, noncustodial parents and foster parents have the right to view a child’s records. However, only custodial parents may challenge its content or consent to its release. Adult students have the same rights as parents of minor students.

Schools must keep a log, open only to parents and school officials, which lists those who have received information from a student’s record and how the information was used.

The school may release directory information about students. But parents (or the student if over 18) must be notified as to the type of information to be released. Parents have the right to block the release of the information by notifying the school of their objection. Usually a notice dealing with this issue is sent home at the beginning of the school year. (See the legal citation for the federal Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act, or FERPA, at the end of this publication.)

Public library records are confidential under the California Public Records Act. All registration and circulation records of any library which receives public funds may only be disclosed for library employees to do their job, by order of a superior court, or if the person authorizes the release.

Confidential data includes information provided to receive a library card and a list of the materials that have been borrowed. Records of fines and statistical reports are not confidential. Privately-funded libraries may not have the same privacy protection as those which receive public funds. You may want to request a copy of the facility’s policies.

Criminal history information compiled by local and state criminal justice departments is not public in California. “Rap” sheets (records of arrests and prosecutions) can only be accessed by:

  • Law enforcement agencies
  • Attorneys working on a case involving the individual
  • The subject of the information
  • Probation or parole officers
  • A state agency which needs the information to license an individual
  • Employers, under limited circumstances authorized by law

With the increasing computerization of records, however, information brokers are able to compile what amounts to a “rap sheet” by searching arrest records and court files that are public records. This information is sometimes used by employers to run background checks on prospective employees. Such records can be obtained from Internet-based information broker services.

4. Federal Privacy Laws

The two main federal privacy laws are the Privacy Act of 1974 and the Freedom of Information Act. They apply only to federal government agencies. At first glance, the two laws seem diametrically opposed. The Privacy Act deals with keeping government records about individuals confidential, and the Freedom of Information Act is commonly used to pry open government files. However, these laws are attempts to balance the public’s right to know about the actions of government with the rights of an individual to retain his or her privacy. (Legal cites are located at the end of this guide.)

The Privacy Act gives an individual the right to:

  • See and copy files that the federal government maintains on him or her
  • Find out who else has had access to the information
  • And request a change in any information that is not accurate or relevant

A government agency is required to:

  • Respond to a request for information within 10 days; notify the public about the types of files they maintain via the Federal Register; inform the public how they use the information; make sure the information in files is relevant
  • Not use the information for any purpose other than the one for which it was initially collected

Government files on an individual may be opened to others in a few cases including:

  • A purpose similar to the original reason for collecting the information
  • For statistical research
  • For law enforcement purposes
  • When ordered by a court
  • If it is medically necessary for the requester to have access to the information

There is no central index of federal government records about individuals. If you want to look at your records, you must first identify which agency has them. Then use the Privacy Act to ask to see your files. The agency must respond to your request within 10 days. You may be charged a “reasonable” fee for copying the file.

You may be denied access to government records about you if they involve:

  • Law enforcement activities
  • The Central Intelligence Agency (CIA)
  • Litigation
  • Civil service exams (to the extent access would affect the fairness of the tests)
  • Confidential government sources

If you are denied access to your records, you can appeal in court. You may also take a government agency to court if you believe it has improperly disclosed information about you or if you want to block impending disclosures.

The Freedom of Information Act was designed to help individuals obtain information about the actions of government. It requires that citizens be given access to government records unless disclosure involves:

  • Litigation
  • The Central Intelligence Agency (CIA)
  • Internal agency memos
  • Personnel matters
  • Trade secrets
  • Classified documents
  • Law enforcement activities
  • Confidential government sources
  • Violating an individual’s privacy interests
  • Civil service exams (to the extent it would affect the fairness of the tests)

The agency has 20 days to make a determination on a request for access. If you are denied, you may appeal the denial either within the agency itself or in court.
5. California Privacy Laws

California has two state laws which are similar to federal privacy legislation: the Information Practices Act and the Public Records Act. (The legal citations are found at the end of this guide.)

The California Information Practices Act applies only to state agencies. It is similar to the federal Privacy Act and gives individuals access to information about them held by state agencies. However, the Information Practices Act does not require the state to publish a list of the type of records agencies create.

If you request information, the state agency must respond within 30 to 60 days. You can be denied access to your records for the same reasons as under the Privacy Act. If a request is denied, you must be told the reason for the denial. You can appeal the decision in court.

If you find incorrect information in a record the state keeps about you, you have the right to amend your file. The agency must note in the record that you dispute its accuracy.

The Information Practices Act does not cover city or county government records. Local governments are free to make their own laws in this area.

The California Public Records Act is similar to the federal Freedom of Information Act and covers state, city and county boards, special districts, commissions, agencies and school districts. With a few exceptions, all records from these bodies are considered public documents. The major exemptions from public disclosure include:

  • Personnel matter
  • Medical records
  • Tax records
  • Litigation
  • Public library records
  • Preliminary drafts, notes, or memos
  • Complaints or investigations by law enforcement authorities unless the person requesting the information is involved in the crime or suspected crime
  • Information which would compromise civil service exams

If you request information under the California Public Records Act, the agency must let you know within 10 days that it has received your request. If your request is denied, you must be notified within 10 days and given the reason the information is not being released. You have the right to appeal such decisions in court.

6. Policy Considerations

Traditionally, public records were obtained by visiting the appropriate government agency and inspecting or copying them there. But Internet access to government records is increasing. Consumers should be aware of the growing public policy debate over the availability of government records online. While such records have always been public, Internet access is making them easier to gather and compile, both by individual citizens and by a variety of institutional users. Information brokers, direct marketers, employers, private investigators, law enforcement officers and other government agencies are finding new ways to use this information.

Should public records, including sensitive court files like divorce records and insurance cases containing medical information, be freely available by anyone via the Internet? The issue of online access to public records will be an increasingly significant privacy concern in the coming years. For additional information on this matter, read the PRC’s Public Records on the Internet: the Privacy Dilemma andThe Privacy Advisor (May 1, 2012) Assessing Public Information in the Digital Age.

7. Resources

The information in this Fact Sheet covers only the most common government records. There are a number of other government agencies that may contain information about you. For example, various local, state and federal agencies license individuals for certain professions, and many of these records are open to the public.

A useful guide to federal government information is Your Right to Federal Records, GSA Federal Citizen Information Center (November 2009).www.pueblo.gsa.gov/cic_text/fed_prog/foia/foia.htm

The California Public Records Act is explained in Access to Public Records in California,” Citizen Media Law Project www.citmedialaw.org/legal-guide/california/access-public-records-california

Individuals may obtain a copy of their criminal record by writing to the Federal Bureau of Investigation. Include a letter stating why you are making the request, a set of fingerprints and a money order (no checks) for $18. Mail to: FBI, Criminal Justice Information Services Div., 1000 Custer Hollow Rd., Clarksburg, WV 26306. Telephone: (304) 625-3878. Web: www.fbi.gov/hq/cjisd/fprequest.htm

Individuals who do not have a criminal record can make a request under the Freedom of Information Act to determine if the FBI has compiled information about them. The request must be in writing and should include a complete name, address, date and place of birth and notarized signature. It should be sent to FBI, Freedom of Information Privacy Section, at the same address and telephone number as the previous paragraph.

On the state level, to receive a copy of your “rap” sheet (record of arrests and prosecutions), contact the California Attorney General. Write to: California Department of Justice, Record Review Unit, P.O. Box 903417, Sacramento, CA 94203-7410. Telephone: (916) 227-3832. Send a $25 for the processing fee, plus 10-print fingerpint card, name, date of birth, gender, address, and letter stating purpose of request. Web: http://ag.ca.gov/fingerprints/security.php.

For additional information on California birth, death and marriage certificates, contact: Center for Health Statistics, California Department of Public Health, Office of Vital Records, P.O. Box 997410, Sacramento, CA 95899-7410. Telephone: (916) 445-2684 (recorded message). Web:http://www.cdph.ca.gov/certlic/birthdeathmar/Pages/ContactUs.aspx

Legal citations for federal and state laws on government records are as follows:

Federal laws: (www.law.cornell.edu/uscode)

Privacy Act of 1974, 5 USC, § 552a.
Freedom of Information Act, 5 USC, § 552.
Family Educational Rights & Privacy Act (FERPA), 20 USC § 1232

California state laws: (www.leginfo.ca.gov/calaw.html)

Information Practices Act, Calif. Civil Code, § 1798.
Public Records Act, Calif. Government Code, § 6250.

5 helpful tips for getting your DMV wholesale car dealer license

  1. Sign up for our 6 hour Car Dealer Pre-Licensing Class. Follow the steps that you are taught, and then get approved by the California DMV as a wholesale dealer.
  2. Utilize the Web. Did you know that most wholesale dealers search the internet prior to purchasing a vehicle? A good wholesaler will recognize a low priced car at auction buy it and resell it a week later at the same auction.
  3. Keep in mind that delivery of the vehicle to the buyer must occur at the sellers licensed location. Some wholesalers will buy seasoned stock ( vehicles which are front line ready on a retailers lot but approaching 60 days in inventory ) and swap them out for vehicles freshly obtained. This allows the used car sales manager to restart the clock on that seasoned stock. These deals are often done book for book, the wholesaler ends up with added value. In a front line ready car the wholesaler can sell to another dealer, but it will often take a series of these book for book trades before you can actually see profits. Many small used car lots do not have the time to go to auction. A good wholesaler can stock these smaller lots and make a small profit on each car.
  4. Don’t ever consign a vehicle to another dealer. The wholesale license is a good starting place for the beginner; lesser bond, easier zoning and access to the market. Dealer plates and insurance are included in the wholesale package but as a wholesaler one can only buy and sell within the industry. That means as a wholesaler you can sell only to other dealers, there is no buying off the street. If and when a wholesaler has a vehicle to sell to the public he/she may draft that sale through a licensed retailer, this is call this a drafted sale.
  5. Remember the drafted sale creates liability for the retailer. Typical draft fee is $ 500. We advise the following: no loss selling ( wholesaler must sell higher than acquisition cost ), smog safety and verification provided by wholesaler, wholesaler as contact person on the buyers guide, statement from wholesaler assuming all liability if customer is not happy. Then the retailer collects and pays all taxes and fees, and sends the documents to DMV for processing.

Tips

  • Wholesale Dealers cannot sell to the Public (only to other Car Dealers).
  • Wholesale Car Dealers have a lower bond requirement and spend less on insurance.
  • When selling to the public you must use a Drafted Sale.
  • Wholesale dealers provide a much needed asset to the retail car market. Wholesalers provide cars to retail dealers and often facilitate trades among dealers. A good car buyer will make a little on each car (perhaps $ 300), but can only sell up to 24 cars in one year.

Related wikiHows

Sources and Citations

got the correct DMV registration forms ???

Most Commonly Used DMV Forms

Adobe Acrobat Reader is required to view, fill out and print forms. To incorporate the latest accessibility features download of the latest version of Acrobat Reader may be required. If you have problems with Acrobat Reader or our PDF form, select PDF Troubleshooting. To submit a form electronically, use the eForm version. For large quantities, read Ordering DMV Forms in Large Quantities To obtain a form by mail, call DMV’s automated phone service 24 hours a day, 7 days a week at 1-800-777-0133. To speak to an operator call between the hours of 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday – Friday, Pacific Time.

Click on the Clicking this symbol will display form instructions. to view information for the form.

Drivers

Change of Address (PDF) (DMV 14) Click to view form instructions.

Request for Own Driver License or Vehicle Registration Record (PDF) (INF 1125) Click to view form instructions.

Traffic Accident Report (PDF) eforms Click to view form instructions.

Vehicles

Bill of Sale (PDF) (REG 135) Click to view form instructions.

Notice of Release of Liability (PDF) (REG 138) Click to view form instructions.

Application for Duplicate Title (PDF) (REG 227) Click to view form instructions.

Application for Title or Registration (REG 343) (PDF) Click to view form instructions.

Statement of Facts (PDF) (REG 256) Click to view form instructions.

Plates, Placards, and Stickers

Special Interest License Plates Application (PDF) (REG 17) Click to view form instructions.

Application for Replacement Plates, Sticker, Documents (PDF) (REG 156) Click to view form instructions.

Application for Disabled Person Parking Placard or Plates (PDF) (REG 195) Click to view form instructions.

Back to Main forms page

seven helpful tips for red flag rules compliance from zurich insurance

IF YOU OFFER CREDIT…..GET RED FLAG CERTIFIED

WITH

GOTPLATES.COM

800-901-5950

+++++

To help ensure your dealership gets and stays in compliance, Zurich insurance recommends the following seven steps:

1. Put the program in writing

Your program must contain reasonable policies and procedures to address four primary responsibilities under the rule. The rule also states that each program must be documented in writing. While potentially burdensome, this requirement has obvious advantages to the dealer. It forms the basis for the employee training that is required by the rule, and makes responding to government audits and inquiries possible.

2. Make a list of patterns, practices or specific activities that could be red flags signaling possible identity theft.

Your policies and procedures should require that you become at least reasonably certain of your customer’s buyer’s identity. A supplement to the rule on the FTC’s website provides illustrations of 26 possible red flags that fall into the following five categories:

—Receiving alerts, notifications or warnings from a consumer-reporting agency

—The customer presents suspicious documents.

—The customer presents suspicious personal identifying information, such as a suspect address.

—Dealership staff notices unusual use of or suspicious activity within an existing account.

—You receive notices from customers, victims of identity theft, law enforcement authorities or other businesses about possible identity theft in connection with an existing account.

Note, not all 26 possible red flags will be relevant to the way your dealership does business.

In particular, unless you have accounts to which customers can make charges after origination, for example, house credit accounts, the seven possible red flags in category four are not likely to apply to your dealership.

You also need to guard against identity theft risks that result from employee access to account information. Employee access should already be limited as part of your overall information security program.

3. Make a list of methods used to detect and evaluate if a red flag has occurred.

The program should describe procedures used to verify customer information and detect when information is incorrect. Some procedures include:

—Specifying acceptable forms of identifying information required of each finance customer

—Specifying procedures to verify identifying information, for example, using third-party resources to confirm identification or detect fraud

—Using a system to monitor employee compliance relative to their access and use of customer account information

4. Describe how your dealership will respond when red flags are detected.

The program must contain reasonable policies for responding to red flags detected during a transaction. This should include a procedure for escalating unresolved situations to senior management.

Some appropriate responses to unresolved red flags would be to:

—Not continue the transaction

—Use additional resources to verify the customer’s identity.

—Notify law enforcement.

—Determine that no response is warranted.

5. Document all red flag responses and keep them in the customer file.

All red flag responses should also be kept in a dealership file to be used to maintain and update the program.

6. Detail a plan to update the program periodically.

Update the program to reflect changes in risks to customers or to your dealership’s safety and security based upon:

—Your experience with identity theft

—New methods of identity theft

—New methods of identity theft prevention and detection

—Changes in the types of accounts offered or maintained by your dealership

—Changes in your dealership’s business or structure such as mergers and changes in service provider arrangements

7. Follow the Red Flags Rule guidelines in managing the program.

The rule provides for some specific administrative actions that need to take place to adequately manage your program. These include that your program must:

—Be approved and implemented by your dealership’s board of directors or, if no board exists, a designated member of the senior management team.

—Be periodically evaluated to determine if updates are necessary.

—Include training for relevant staff on their obligations under the program.

—Be able to ensure service providers have reasonable procedures to detect, prevent and mitigate the risk of identity theft.

Penalties for Violations

Penalties for violations of these regulations are stiff. These include the following:

—A “knowing” violation of the rule is a violation of the FTC Act, which provides for a $3,500 civil penalty for each violation.

—Enforcement actions by the FTC can carry penalties of up to $11,000 per violation, per day.

—Dealers may also be liable under state unfair and deceptive acts, and practices law, which may include individual and class action claims.

Additional resources from the FTC can be found here.

get private car dealer license training from gotplates.com

hello john

we teach private classes
for $ 300. per person
we have weekly availability statewide

if we come to your office
we would have to charge more ( $ 800. )
and we can certify up to three people for that fee

also, if you offer financing and need the
red flags program
we can set you up with that as well
our discounted price for the red flags is $ 300.

red flag deadline was 01-01-11

do you have any other owners needing certification?

if this is a corporate change of ownership
dmv generally requires all owners above 10% ownership to take the class
and pass the dmv examination

also, all significant others should be included if they are going to be driving
dealer plated inventory

please let us know what works for you
and how soon you want the private car dealer license class

my cell is 415-730-3131

thx

Joseph
gotplates.com

800-901-5950

car dealer license forms checklist

A VEHICLE DEALER APPLICATION CONSISTS OF THE FOLLOWING FORMS:
• OL 248A New Dealer Application Check List OR
OL 248B Used Dealer, Dealer-Wholesale Only, and Autobroker Application Check List
• OL 12 Application for Original Occupational License, (Part C)
• OL 21A Original Application for Occupational License, (Part A)
• OL 25 Surety Bond of Dealer ($50,000) OR
OL 25B Surety Bond of Motorcycle Dealer, Motorcycle Lessor-Retailer, All-Terrain Vehicle
Dealer, or Wholesale-Only Dealer (Less Than 25 Vehicles Per Year) $10,000 OR

OL 65/OL 94 with Cash Bond OR

OL 64/OL65 with Passbook or Certiicate of Deposit

• OL 53 Authorization to Release Financial Information
• OL 124 Certiicate of Proposed Franchise
Required for new automobile, commercial, motorcycle, all- terrain vehicle, motorhome, and
recreational trailer dealers only.
• OL 902 Property Use Veriication for Vehicle Dealer’s License
• OL 29 Application for Occupational License Personal History Questionnaire, (Part B)
Required for each person listed under ownership on form OL 12.
• ADM 9050 Appointment of Director as Agent for Service of Process
• DMV 8016 Request for Live Scan Clearance (yellow copy).
Required for each person completing form OL 29. Details on page 9. Out-of-state applicants
call Occupational Licensing at (916) 229-3126 for Fingerprint Card (ADM 1316).

 

please call 2

fleet buyers get licensed with gotplates.com

If you are a multiple car business like a:
car rental service
delivery service
large contractor
fleet service
etc…

GotPlates.com

You can obtain auction access and avoid the dealer markup by obtaining your dealer license.

If you are buying more than three vehicles a year
you may find it to be a very good move to get your dealer license and benefit from lower car prices,
better cars to choose from and ease of transactions.
Becoming a dealer also allows you better resale prices at disposal.
So why not, – buy at wholesale – sell at retail – and use the vehicles in you own business.
We are your first step in obtaining your dealer license.
We will teach you the ins and outs of becoming a dealer and
provide you with the certificate you need to present to the CA DMV.
Contact us today at: 1.800.901.5950 or admin@gotplates.com
redstar

car dealer red flag rules revised

car dealers offering credit of any form are required to be red flag compliant as of jan 2011

dmv inspectors are now checking for car dealers offering credit to be red flag compliant

here are the new red flag rule guidelines from the FTC:

Revised red flag rules

our red flag compliance program cost is $ 500.

Click here to sign up now

car dealer nurse

yes john…we are always available for private car dealer education

hello john

we teach private classes
for $ 300. per person
we have weekly availability statewide

if we come to your office
we would have to charge more ( $ 800. )
and we can certify up to three people for that fee

also, if you offer financing and need the
red flags program
we can set you up with that as well
our discounted price for the red flags is $ 300.

red flag deadline was 01-01-11

do you have any other owners needing certification?

if this is a corporate change of ownership
dmv generally requires all owners above 10% ownership to take the class
and pass the dmv examination

also, all significant others should be included if they are going to be driving
dealer plated inventory

please let us know what works for you
and how soon you want the private car dealer license class

my cell is 415-730-3131

thx

Joseph
gotplates.com

800-901-5950

FTC tips for the red flag rules

+++

Are you complying with the Red Flags Rule?

The Red Flags Rule requires many businesses and organizations to implement a written Identity Theft Prevention Program designed to detect the warning signs — or “red flags” — of identity theft in their day-to-day operations. By identifying red flags in advance, businesses will be better equipped to spot suspicious patterns that may arise — and take steps to prevent a red flag from escalating into a costly episode of identity theft.

Resources on this site can help business people educate their staff and colleagues about complying with the Red Flags Rule.

What Compliance Looks Like

Your Identity Theft Prevention Program is a “playbook” that must include reasonable policies and procedures for detecting, preventing, and mitigating identity theft. Your Program should enable your organization to:

  1. identify relevant patterns, practices, and specific forms of activity — the “red flags” — that signal possible identity theft;
  2. incorporate business practices to detect red flags;
  3. detail your appropriate response to any red flags you detect to prevent and mitigate identity theft; and
  4. be updated periodically to reflect changes in risks from identity theft.

The Red Flags Rule also includes guidelines to help financial institutions and creditors develop and implement a Program, including a supplement that offers examples of red flags.

The FTC and the federal financial agencies have issued Frequently Asked Questions and answers to help businesses comply with the Rule.

Who Must Comply with the Red Flags Rule?

The Rule requires “financial institutions” and “creditors” that hold consumer accounts designed to permit multiple payments or transactions — or any other account for which there is a reasonably foreseeable risk of identity theft — to develop and implement an Identity Theft Prevention Program for new and existing accounts. The definition of “financial institution” includes:

  • all banks, savings associations, and credit unions, regardless of whether they hold a transaction account belonging to a consumer; and
  • anyone else who directly or indirectly holds a transaction account belonging to a consumer.

A change in the law on December 18, 2010 amended the the definition of “creditor,” and limits the circumstances under which creditors are covered. The new law covers creditors who regularly, and in the ordinary course of business, meet one of three general criteria. They must:

  • obtain or use consumer reports in connection with a credit transaction;
  • furnish information to consumer reporting agencies in connection with a credit transaction; or
  • advance funds to — or on behalf of — someone, except for funds for expenses incidental to a service provided by the creditor to that person.

Bookmark this site and check it often for revisions that reflect changes in the law.

 


 

 

Related Topics

Protecting Personal Information: A Guide for Business

Are you taking steps to protect personal information? Safeguarding sensitive data in your files and on your computers is just plain good business. After all, if that information falls into the wrong hands, it can lead to fraud or identity theft.

Avoid ID Theft: Deter, Detect, Defend

A one-stop national resource to learn about the crime of identity theft. It provides detailed information to help you deter, detect, and defend against identity theft.

OnGuard Online

Provides practical tips from the federal government and the technology industry to help computer users be on guard against Internet fraud, secure their computers, and protect their personal information.

Privacy Initiatives

Educates consumers and businesses about the importance of personal information privacy, including the security of personal information.