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Occupational Licensing Forms page

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great time to become a used car dealer

Jeanette Pavini

JEANETTE PAVINI’S BUYER BEWARE Archives | Email alerts

This is a fantastic time to buy a used car

 By Jeanette Pavini

With the average price of used cars at a four-year low and the proliferation of certified preowned programs offered by car makers, this is a great time to be shopping for a used car. But you need to be well-prepared to get your money’s worth when you drive off the lot.

Some of the best news for used-car shoppers is that pent-up demand is driving up sales of new cars. New-car sales are rebounding strongly and Edmunds.com experts say that trend will continue next year. Plus, the number of expiring leases also is increasing. All this points to a bigger inventory of used cars.


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It also means some models are sitting on the lots a bit longer, and the prices are going down. According to Edmunds.com, the average price for used cars in the third quarter was $15,617, the lowest it has been in four years.

If you’re after a Volvo, GMC or Chevrolet, then you’re in luck. According to Edmunds.com, those three brands sat on lots longer than others and therefore typically carried a lower price. But if you’re after a Honda, Toyota or Lexus, you may find an above-average price. These cars were most popular in the third quarter.

While timing and prices are important, there is also work to be done before you buy a used car, whether it’s from a dealer or an individual. Don’t just drive the car around the block. Give the car a thorough test drive on highways and hills.

Look for an inspection checklist like this used-car work sheet from DMV.org. It reminds you of all the things you need to do, like bringing a CD to test the car stereo, checking the windshield wipers, and making sure the car manual is in the glove department.

Research before you shop. Use a site like Edmunds.com, Kelley Blue Book’s KBB.com orTrueCar.com to estimate the value of the car. This will help you determine a fair price before you go into negotiations.

You may also want to research typical repair and maintenance costs for the vehicle you’re interested.

Some cars are far more expensive to fix and maintain than others, so even if you get a low price, you might still be paying big bucks in the long run. You can use calculators like Edmunds.com’s True Cost to Own feature. It calculates a variety of factors including maintenance and repairs to determine how much your vehicle will actually cost you. Also, check with your insurance company to see if your insurance will go up.

The Federal Trade Commission recommends checking an independent database service to review a vehicle’s history. They suggest the Justice Department’s National Motor Vehicle Title Information System. There is a small fee to receive a report, ranging from about $2.95 to $12.99. per report.

This service is good for more than just cars. You can find reports on buses, trucks, motorcycle, RVs, motor homes—even tractors. The report covers information about the vehicle’s title, odometer, and some damage history.

The National Insurance Crime Bureau has a free database where you enter a car’s vehicle identification number, or VIN, and can access a car’s history to see if it has been reported as a stolen but not recovered car, or a salvage vehicle. According to the NICB, the vehicles stolen the most often in 2012 were the Honda Accord, Honda Civic, Ford full-size pickup, Chevrolet full-size pickup, and Toyota Camry.

The FTC also suggests checking with a local consumer protection agency or your state’s attorney general’s office to find out if a dealer has any unresolved complaints.

The so-called Used Car Rule requires dealers to post a buyer’s guide in each used car (with the exception of dealers in Maine and Wisconsin). It must state whether a vehicle is being sold “as is” or under warranty, including how much of the repairs a dealer will cover under that warranty. Among other things, it will also tell you to have the car inspected by an independent mechanic before you purchase it. This is advice you should definitely take.

And finally, in many states you can purchase the right to a “cooling-off period.” You pay a fee based on the purchase price and if for any reason you change your mind, you have the right to bring the car back within a specified time period. Alternately, some states don’t have cooling-off periods, so check with your state’s motor vehicle department.

Emmy Award-winning broadcast journalist, documentarian and author Jeanette Pavini covers consumer and investigative news for numerous publications, radio and television. Jeanette is based in the San Francisco Bay Area.

car dealer auction assistance from ADESA

The address for dealers

At ADESA, we’re focused on the business—our business and your business. When you need to find, buy or sell vehicles, we’ve got an auction solution for you.

“I have always experienced unfailing quality service from top to bottom in all my dealings with ADESA Sacramento and ADESA Los Angeles. My cars are always clean and they always run in order and at a consistent time week to week. This lets me establish an identity and a brand and to gather a following with an end result of increased wholesale profit.”
– Brett Norberry, Group One Automotive

Read what other dealers are saying about ADESA

Every ADESA location offers a wide range of vehicle remarketing services—from transportation and titling to inspections, reconditioning and more. And with a dedicated dealer-services team and every auction, ADESA is your direct solution for consignment and inventory needs.

Dealer solutions

ADESA offers the industry’s most comprehensive buying and selling solution for dealers. When you couple the physical auction with the online marketplace of ADESA OpenLane, you get continuous exposure of your unwanted and aged inventory.

Helpful links to get you started:
Step-by-step guide to sell on ADESA OpenLane
10 ways to succeed online
Quick start guide

Call the dealer sales and services team at your nearest ADESA location to start selling today.
Contact information is listed under the Dealer Avenue sign on your local auction page.

car dealer application for auction access

Dealer Registration Forms

ADESA auctions are for registered wholesale automotive dealers only, closed to the public. Each dealer has to be registered at an ADESA auction before receiving a bid badge or buying cars online.

Below you will find a series of Web pages, links and printable files that will assist you with the process of registering at your local ADESA Auction facility. Several of these files have been created with Adobe Acrobat for security reasons. To view these files you must have Adobe Acrobat Viewer installed on your computer. If you do not have this program you candownload a free version. These files may also be obtained at your local ADESA auction.

In addition to completing and submitting the required dealer registration forms listed below, please provide copies of the following documents:

  • State dealer’s license or equivalent required state document
  • Current dealer bond, if required by your state
  • Current sales tax certificate
  • Copy of a voided company business check
  • Current salesperson’s license for each representative, if required by your state

Each representative will need to go to the Dealer Registration counter at one of our auctions to have their current driver’s license scanned into Auction ACCESS. If the representative plans to buy online only, please provide a legible copy of their current driver’s license.

ALL of the ADESA and Auction ACCESS forms listed below are required in order to register and participate either online or at any of our U.S. whole car auctions.

Required ADESA Forms:

MTC (Uniform Sales & Use Tax Certificate)
Personal Guaranty
Power of Attorney
Title Handling Form
IRS W-9 Form
US Auction Policy (Terms & Conditions)
NAAA Arbitration Policy
ADESA As-Is Policy
ADESA Post Sale Inspection Policy

Required Auction Access Forms:

Please download the following forms from the Auction Access website.

  • Application
  • Bank Authorization Letter
  • Dealership Credit Information Form
  • Individual Authorization Letter
  • Dealer Authorization/Removal Letter

After completing the documents, please fax or mail them to the dealer registration department at one of the ADESA auctions you would like to attend. You can obtain address, phone and fax contact information using the ADESA Auction List.

do you need new plates for your buyer ???

Standard California license plates are issued when you buy a new vehicle, replace lost, stolen, or mutilated plates, or turn in special interest license plates. License plates identify the type of registration you have (commercial, passenger, trailer, etc.) and provide law enforcement a means of locating the owner through DMV records. Standard license plates can be replaced by submitting an application for duplicate plates, or by visiting a DMV field office.

Passenger Vehicles

passenger vehicle license plate passenger vehicle license plate passenger vehicle license plate

passenger vehicle license plate passenger vehicle license plate passenger vehicle license plate

Exclusions: The letters I, O, and Q are not used in the first or third alpha positions of the alpha-numeric series.

Statutory Authority: Vehicle Code (VC) §§4850, 9250 and Revenue and Taxation Code (RT) §§10751, 10752


Commercial Motor Vehicles

commercial motor vehicle license plate commercial motor vehicle license plate commercial motor vehicle license plate

commercial motor vehicle license plate commercial motor vehicle license plate

Exclusions: The letters I and O are not used in the six-digit alpha-numeric series. I, O, and Q are not used in the seven-digit alpha-numeric series.

Statutory Authority: VC §§4840, 9250.1, 9400 and RT §§10751, 10752


Motorcycles

reflectorized motorcyclew license plate yellow on blue motorcycle license plate

Statutory Authority: VC §§4850, 9250.1 and RT §§ 10751, 10752


Permanent Trailer Identification License Plates

permanent trailer identification license plate

In 2001, the Permanent Trailer Identification (PTI) program went into effect with registrations expiring and trailers being registered for the first time in California on or after December 31, 2001. Camp trailers are subject to the new law, but trailer coaches, and park trailers are excluded. For more information on the PTI program follow this link.

Statutory Authority: VC §§5011, 5014.1, 5017


Trailer License Plates

reflectorized trailer license plate reflectorized trailer license plate reflectorized trailer license plate

yellow on blue trailer license plate

Issued to trailer coaches and park trailers.

Exclusions: The letters I, O, and Q are not used.

Statutory Authority: VC §§4850, 9250.1 and RT §§10751, 10752

cheat the government…..go to prison

State Investigators Arrest Two Riverside Men In Tax Fraud Probe

November 01, 2013

Posh home and Auto Sales Businesses Raided

State investigators with the Franchise Tax Board and Board of Equalization raided a million dollar-plus residence in Riverside and two automobile sales businesses Tuesday, October 29.   After serving the search warrants, investigators arrested Ahmad Mohamod Sami, 38 and Nader M. Sami, 45, both of Riverside.   According to the Riverside County Jail’s website, the two men were each booked on three felony charges including white collar crime, failure to turn over government money and filing false tax returns.

Investigators searched the homes on Wyndham Hill Drive and could be seen loading potential evidence into rented moving vans.  Parked on the two acre parcel were two Bentleys and a Jaguar, all with paper auto dealer plates on them.

Investigators also searched and removed items from A-one Auto Centers located in Riverside and San Bernardino.

“While this investigation has stirred up questions and intrigue among the public in Riverside, the investigators must go about their duties to determine what laws have been violated and see this case through the prosecution process,” said Alan Barcelona, president of the California Statewide Law Enforcement Association (CSLEA).  CSLEA represents nearly 7,000 law enforcement, public safety and consumer protection professionals who work for the State of California including investigators with the Franchise Tax Board.

To see video of  the Tuesday’s Raid visit PE Bloggers

Other articles: http://www.pe.com/business/business-headlines/20131031-riverside-bail-for-a-one-auto-owners-raised-to-2.6-million.ece

gotplates.com and manheim tutorials make it easy to become a successful car dealer

OVE: How to use Watchlist & Saved Searches

play

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Learn how to create a custom list of vehicles and saved searches, so you can track and manage multiple cars, all in one place.

 

OVE: MyLot

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02:50

Find out how to sell online directly from your lot—the quickest and easiest way to sell excess inventory.

 

Simulcast Everywhere: Remote Seller

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Learn everything you need to represent and sell your vehicles from any location when it’s not possible to attend the auction.

Simulcast: Proxy Bidding

play

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Learn how to place proxy bids in multiple auctions when you can’t watch the sale, so you’ll never miss a vehicle again.

 

Simulcast Everywhere: Proxy Bidding

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Learn how to place a proxy bid if you can’t participate in the sale in real time—and our system automatically bids for you.

 

MAFS: How to floorplan vehicles and more

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Learn how floorplanning your vehicles with MAFS can help optimize your business.

Simulcast Everywhere: How to Buy

play

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Learn everything you need to start buying vehicles in a Simulcast Everywhere sale.

 

OVE: How to Buy

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Learn how to start buying and bidding on vehicles on OVE.com, from finding cars and proxy bidding to buy now and make an offer.

 

Simulcast: How to Buy

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04:08

Learn how to start bidding and buying on Simulcast—bringing the live auction experience right to your desktop.

Frontline: Retail Ready

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03:17

Learn about Frontline services and how they ensure your vehicles are retail ready, so you can sell at higher prices.

 

Mobile: How to Buy

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03:30

Learn how to use Manheim’s mobile applications to start bidding and buying vehicles with your mobile device.

 

Local Auction: In-Lane Buyer

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04:35

Learn how to purchase vehicles in an in-lane auction at one of our operating locations.

Simulcast Everywhere: How to set up a sale

play

03:01

Learn everything you need to start selling your inventory with a Simulcast Everywhere sale.

 

OVE: Add and Edit Vehicles

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06:35

Learn how to add and edit inventory, pictures, and prices, as well as preview your listings.

 

Simulcast: How to Sell

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03:03

Learn how to price and sell your vehicles online through Simulcast on Manheim.com.

OVE: Move Vehicles

play

03:20

Learn how to move vehicles between account groups in Inventory Manager and activate the Sell Now option.

 

Local Auction: In-Lane Seller

play

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Learn how to register your vehicles for in-lane auction sale at one of our operating locations and explore post-sale services.

renting indiana car dealer license plates WILL get you busted in california

one of the fastest ways to get in trouble

with your car dealer license

is to cheat the government

on its sales tax or the dmv registration fees

the other way

IS TO RENT OUT DEALER LICENSE PLATES

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no matter what you call it

no matter how you present it

RENTING CAR DEALER PLATES IS ILLEGAL

California DMV Car Dealer Plate Rules

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offering to rent you a car dealer plate

THEY ARE ALL ILLEGAL IN CALIFORNIA

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Dealer License Pros  ( Scam )

Your Auto Dealership ( Scam )

National Dealer License ( Scam )

Auto Dealer License USA ( Scam )

DLC Network ( Scam )

Car Profit ( Scam )

FL Motors ( Scam )

Auto Income ( Scam )

Auto Auction Consulting ( Scam )

Flipping Autos ( Scam )

Delaware Wholesaler ( Scam )

Indiana Wholesale Dealers ( Scam )

Indiana Dealer Offices ( Scam )

One Stop Auto Wholesalers ( Scam )

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most of the bad actors belong to this organization

Indiana Wholesalers Association

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you may contact our dmv car dealer attorney for advice and consultation

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“AS IS”

Cash Contract

Simple – SPANISH

$49.99

California Civil Code Section 2981 mandates that sales contracts be completed when a motor vehilce is sold from a licensed entitiy (dealership). All contracts need to be in writing and must be contained on a single document. The contract is designed to protect both the consumer and the dealer by clearly stating the terms of the sale. The contract must include a proper description of the vehicle, the total cost and terms of the sale, as well as the prescribed disclosures required by statue. All contracts must be completed and signed by both parties (buyer and seller). Be sure to provide a clear copy of the contract to the consmer. This form is in complete compliance with disclosures, and is to be used for Cash in house deals when no financing is applicable. 14 3/4″ x 8 1/2″ – 2-part – 100 /pkg . Printed in Spanish.
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Car Dealer Forms Starter Kit

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indiana dealer plates are a SCAM….california license costs just $ 300. per month

we estimate your california wholesale home based part time car dealer license expenses:

your car dealer bond $ 300.

your car dealer training $ 150.

your car dealer insurance $ 1800.

your car dealer license $ 150.

your car dealer plates $ 150.

your car dealer forms $ 200.

your car dealer office expenses $ 500.

your car dealer auction access $ 100.

your car dealer checking account $ 250.

get licensed with our car dealer school

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cheat the government…..go to prison

Export scammers’ gain is dealers’ pain

Feds seek headway against black-market rings

“This is a first of its kind prosecution, and I hope it will not be the last. These rings are far reaching,” said John Kacavas, the U.S. attorney for New Hampshire.
Automotive News
July 1, 2013 – 12:01 am ET

First it was a $70,000 Mercedes-Benz GL350. Then another one, followed by a BMW X6 and a Porsche Cayenne. All were paid for in cash.

Jane Goss, the town clerk and tax collector in tiny Sanbornton, N.H., realized something was fishy after a local man started coming into her office every few weeks to register high-end SUVs.

“I knew that he didn’t have the means to pay for these cars fully,” said Goss, who also noticed that the man never drove any of the vehicles to her office. “I don’t know of anybody in Sanbornton who can do that. By the fifth one, I said, ‘No, I can’t register this car.'”

Federal authorities say the man unwittingly had become part of a scheme that illegally exported thousands of luxury vehicles to China. In what has become a burgeoning black-market industry, exporters typically hire straw buyers in the United States and send vehicles overseas by claiming them as used on customs declarations. The buyers often never see the vehicles they claim to be purchasing for personal use.

High prices and heavy demand for luxury cars and SUVs in China, caused in part by 25 percent tariffs on imported new vehicles, mean scammers can often sell the vehicles for at least double what they would get in the United States. A new BMW X6 costs more than 1 million yuan in China, or about $171,500, compared with a U.S. starting price of $60,725; the Porsche Cayenne has a base price of 922,000 yuan, or about $148,750, in China, and $50,575 at U.S. dealerships.

Even after factoring in considerable shipping costs and other expenses, the exporters can make a huge profit on each vehicle by undercutting legitimate dealerships in China.

The schemes can cause big financial problems for U.S. dealerships, which are contractually prohibited from selling new vehicles to anyone who intends to export them and can be penalized by the automakers for doing so — even if they do so unwittingly.

Dealerships that sell to exporters may be forced to pay charge-backs, have incentives revoked and receive fewer vehicles from the factory in the future. Widespread fraudulent registrations also hurt dealerships that do not sell to exporters because such registrations understate the dealerships’ actual market shares, making it appear they are falling short of sales targets. That can affect bonuses paid by automakers as well as future allocations.

First prosecution

New Hampshire has been at the center of several large export schemes because it is the only state with neither a sales tax nor a requirement that vehicle owners carry insurance. Exporters maximize their profits by having vehicles titled there, even though many of the vehicles are bought elsewhere and never enter the state.

John Kacavas, the U.S. attorney for New Hampshire, recently announced that two California men pleaded guilty to federal mail fraud charges and violations of U.S. customs laws, in what officials say was the first successful prosecution of a major vehicle-exporting operation. The defendants admitted to scheming to export 93 vehicles worth more than $5.5 million that they and others bought in 16 states.

Authorities seized 14 of the vehicles at California’s Port of Long Beach and began forfeiture proceedings. The men, Frank Ku, 31, and Danny Hsu, 33, were fined $5,000 and sentenced to three years probation in May.

“This is a first of its kind prosecution, and I hope it will not be the last,” Kacavas told Automotive News, while declining to discuss investigations into any other operations. “These rings are far reaching. Some are operating on a scale much grander than Ku and Hsu.”

In the case, Kacavas said his office was more focused on trying to recover as many vehicles as possible and deterring additional exporting than sending Ku and Hsu to prison.

Court documents say Ku and Hsu found straw buyers by looking on Craigslist for ads posted by people who appeared to need money. Those buyers, who received “a few hundred dollars” for each vehicle they purchased, were not charged.

“Some of them were sort of hapless victims as far as we were concerned and not worthy of federal prosecution,” Kacavas said. “They made very little money from doing this.”

But for the exporters, he said, “it’s very lucrative.”

Ku and Hsu, who ran a company called CFLA, paid New Hampshire residents to use their addresses so they and other employees could falsely obtain local driver’s licenses. Court documents show they made some of the purchases themselves, in addition to using straw buyers, and in some cases they had an employee fly from California to pose as a straw buyer’s fiancee and handle all of the payment and paperwork.

Export scam

How the vehicle exporting scheme run by Frank Ku and Danny Hsu from October 2009 through March 2012 worked
• Ku and Hsu used Craigslist to find straw buyers and people who would let them use local addresses to obtain fake driver’s licenses.
• They or the straw buyers purchased high-end vehicles with checks from a local bank account. Straw buyers would earn several hundred dollars for each transaction.
• They applied for titles in New Hampshire, New Jersey and other states, claiming that each vehicle was for personal use and posing as the straw buyers when the Department of Motor Vehicles questioned the applications.
• Vehicles were shipped to the Port of Long Beach in California.
• After their titles were issued and forwarded to California, the vehicles were shipped overseas with export declarations that categorized them as used.
• When the vehicles got to China, Ku and Hsu delivered the vehicles to buyers who had ordered them in advance, often for more than double the U.S. price.
• They successfully exported 79 vehicles, and 14 more were seized in Long Beach. The average value of each vehicle was about $53,000.
Source: Court filings

Troopers issued warning

Goss, the clerk in Sanbornton, a town of about 3,000 people in the center of the state, said she had attended a class in which state troopers warned clerks to be on the lookout for suspicious registrations of high-end vehicles. The man she confronted started showing up about a year later, in late 2010.

When questioned by the town’s police chief, Stephen Hankard, the buyer readily acknowledged buying the SUVs for someone else and seemed unaware that he might be part of an illegitimate operation.

“He answered a Craigslist ad, and I think he honestly believed that what he was doing was legal,” Hankard said. “He seemed pretty confident in what he was saying.”

After alerting Immigration and Customs Enforcement officials in March 2011, Hankard said, “police chiefs from all over the place started calling me” because their clerks had noticed unusual vehicle purchases as well.

The Sanbornton buyer has not been charged with a crime. Information he gave customs agents helped lead Kacavas in May to charge a Chinese national, Hong Chen, who runs several businesses based in Maryland and Virginia, with mail fraud and misuse of export declarations.

Chen and his businesses are accused of illegally exporting nearly 3,000 vehicles worth more than $157 million — an average of about $53,000 each — from February 2008 through March 2013. About 40 vehicles being prepared for export were seized at the Port of Newark in New Jersey in April, documents show.

Chen was arrested in May, and a judge recently agreed to delay his trial until later this summer to allow for negotiations between prosecutors and his lawyer, who did not return a call seeking comment.

Dealerships harmed

Detective Sgt. Andrew Player of the New Hampshire State Police said his agency has become more active in rooting out illegal vehicle exports, and legislators have discussed ways to make such crimes harder to pull off.

“It’s been going on for a while,” Player said. “We began to receive complaints from the automotive dealers themselves. They were concerned about what was going on and getting charge-backs.”

U.S. Customs regulations only allow new vehicles to be exported by their manufacturer, and still consider vehicles to be new if bought for resale purposes.

According to a deposition by the customs agent who investigated the Chen case, Mercedes-Benz USA has a policy allowing the company to impose the following penalties if it discovers that a vehicle was exported less than a year after being sold as new: “an administrative expense equal to 8.5 percent” of the suggested retail price, “any market support funds or special program discounts paid by MBUSA for that vehicle will be charged back” and “the dealership will lose one like-model unit on the next decade allocation.”

Paul Holloway, whose Holloway Automotive Group has two Mercedes-Benz stores and other dealerships in New Hampshire, said at an April news conference with Kacavas that his company had sustained losses “in the six figures” as a result of export schemes. “This is just a fraction of what’s going on,” Holloway’s partner, David Cushman, told the New Hampshire Union Leader newspaper.

Court documents in the Chen case say a 2010 Mercedes GL350 BlueTEC was bought in October 2010 from Holloway Motor Cars of Manchester and shipped to China about a month later. They show that only one of the four SUVs and crossovers registered in Sanbornton was bought in New Hampshire, with the others coming from Mercedes-Benz dealerships near Boston and a Porsche dealership outside Syracuse, N.Y., more than 300 miles away.

The X6 was bought at a BMW dealership — directly across the street from a police station — that officials said also fell victim to Ku and Hsu’s scheme.

You can reach Nick Bunkley at nbunkley@crain.com. — Follow Nick on Twitter

Read more: http://www.autonews.com/article/20130701/RETAIL07/307019970/export-scammers-gain-is-dealers-pain#ixzz2l6pxq4BA
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